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Homework

Werrington Primary School

Homework

Year 4 will have English and Maths homework each week.  English will be an activity in their red homework books, regular reading (daily where possible) and learning spellings for their weekly test (Friday).

Maths will be an activity on Abacus and weekly times tables test preparation.  Some children will also be given extra Maths challenges in their homework book to push their Maths learning further.

As an extra, any discussions around telling the time would be incredibly beneficial for your child.  This could include analogue time, digital time, 24 hour times and time problems.

 

New work for years 3 and 4

 

Statutory requirements

 

Rules and guidance (non‑statutory)

Example words (non‑statutory)

Adding suffixes beginning with vowel letters to words of more than one syllable

 

If the last syllable of a word is stressed and ends with one consonant letter which has just one vowel letter before it, the final consonant letter is doubled before any ending beginning with a vowel letter is added. The consonant letter is not doubled if the syllable is unstressed.

forgetting, forgotten, beginning, beginner, prefer, preferred



gardening, gardener, limiting, limited, limitation

The /ɪ/ sound spelt y elsewhere than at the end of words

 

These words should be learnt as needed.

myth, gym, Egypt, pyramid, mystery

The /ʌ/ sound spelt ou

 

These words should be learnt as needed.

young, touch, double, trouble, country

More prefixes

 

Most prefixes are added to the beginning of root words without any changes in spelling, but see in– below.

 

 

 

Like un–, the prefixes dis– and mis– have negative meanings.

dis–: disappoint, disagree, disobey

mis–: misbehave, mislead, misspell (mis + spell)

 

 

The prefix in– can mean both ‘not’ and ‘in’/‘into’. In the words given here it means ‘not’.

in–: inactive, incorrect

 

Statutory requirements

 

Rules and guidance (non‑statutory)

Example words (non‑statutory)

 

 

Before a root word starting with l, in– becomes il.

illegal, illegible

 

 

Before a root word starting with m or p, in– becomes im–.

immature, immortal, impossible, impatient, imperfect

 

 

Before a root word starting with r, in– becomes ir–.

irregular, irrelevant, irresponsible

 

 

re– means ‘again’ or ‘back’.

re–: redo, refresh, return, reappear, redecorate

 

 

sub– means ‘under’.

sub–: subdivide, subheading, submarine, submerge

 

 

inter– means ‘between’ or ‘among’.

inter–: interact, intercity, international, interrelated (inter + related)

 

 

super– means ‘above’.

super–: supermarket, superman, superstar

 

 

anti– means ‘against’.

anti–: antiseptic, anti-clockwise, antisocial

 

 

auto– means ‘self’ or ‘own’.

auto–: autobiography, autograph

The suffix –ation

 

The suffix –ation is added to verbs to form nouns. The rules already learnt still apply.

information, adoration, sensation, preparation, admiration

The suffix –ly

 

The suffix –ly is added to an adjective to form an adverb. The rules already learnt still apply.

The suffix –ly starts with a consonant letter, so it is added straight on to most root words.

sadly, completely, usually (usual + ly), finally (final + ly), comically (comical + ly)

 

Statutory requirements

 

Rules and guidance (non‑statutory)

Example words (non‑statutory)

 

 

Exceptions:

(1) If the root word ends in –y with a consonant letter before it, the y is changed to i, but only if the root word has more than one syllable.

 

happily, angrily

 

 

(2) If the root word ends with –le, the –le is changed to –ly.

gently, simply, humbly, nobly

 

 

(3) If the root word ends with –ic,
–ally is added rather than just –ly, except in the word publicly.

basically, frantically, dramatically

 

 

(4) The words truly, duly, wholly.

 

Words with endings sounding like /ʒə/ or /tʃə/

 

The ending sounding like /ʒə/ is always spelt –sure.

The ending sounding like /tʃə/ is often spelt –ture, but check that the word is not a root word ending in (t)ch with an er ending – e.g. teacher, catcher, richer, stretcher.

measure, treasure, pleasure, enclosure

creature, furniture, picture, nature, adventure

Endings which sound like /ʒən/

 

If the ending sounds like /ʒən/, it is spelt as –sion.

division, invasion, confusion, decision, collision, television

The suffix –ous

 

Sometimes the root word is obvious and the usual rules apply for adding suffixes beginning with vowel letters.

Sometimes there is no obvious root word.

–our is changed to –or before –ous is added.

A final ‘e’ of the root word must be kept if the /dʒ/ sound of ‘g’ is to be kept.

If there is an /i:/ sound before the
–ous ending, it is usually spelt as i, but a few words have e.

poisonous, dangerous, mountainous, famous, various

tremendous, enormous, jealous

humorous, glamorous, vigorous

courageous, outrageous
 

serious, obvious, curious
hideous, spontaneous, courteous

 

Statutory requirements

 

Rules and guidance (non‑statutory)

Example words (non‑statutory)

Endings which sound like /ʃən/, spelt –tion, –sion, –ssion, –cian

 

Strictly speaking, the suffixes are –ion and –ian. Clues about whether to put t, s, ss or c before these suffixes often come from the last letter or letters of the root word.

–tion is the most common spelling. It is used if the root word ends in t or te.

–ssion is used if the root word ends in ss or –mit.
 

–sion is used if the root word ends in d or se.
Exceptions: attend – attention, intend – intention.

–cian is used if the root word ends in c or cs.





 

invention, injection, action, hesitation, completion

expression, discussion, confession, permission, admission

expansion, extension, comprehension, tension
 

musician, electrician, magician, politician, mathematician

Words with the /k/ sound spelt ch (Greek in origin)

 

 

scheme, chorus, chemist, echo, character

Words with the /ʃ/ sound spelt ch (mostly French in origin)

 

 

chef, chalet, machine, brochure

Words ending with the /g/ sound spelt –gue and the /k/ sound spelt –que (French in origin)

 

 

league, tongue, antique, unique

Words with the /s/ sound spelt sc (Latin in origin)

 

In the Latin words from which these words come, the Romans probably pronounced the c and the k as two sounds rather than one – /s/ /k/.

science, scene, discipline, fascinate, crescent

Words with the /eɪ/ sound spelt ei, eigh, or ey

 

 

vein, weigh, eight, neighbour, they, obey

 

Statutory requirements

 

Rules and guidance (non‑statutory)

Example words (non‑statutory)

Possessive apostrophe with plural words

 

The apostrophe is placed after the plural form of the word; –s is not added if the plural already ends in
–s, but is added if the plural does not end in –s (i.e. is an irregular plural – e.g. children’s).

girls’, boys’, babies’, children’s, men’s, mice’s

(Note: singular proper nouns ending in an s use the ’s suffix e.g. Cyprus’s population)

Homophones and near-homophones

 

 

accept/except, affect/effect, ball/bawl, berry/bury, brake/break, fair/fare, grate/great, groan/grown, here/hear, heel/heal/he’ll, knot/not, mail/male, main/mane, meat/meet, medal/meddle, missed/mist, peace/piece, plain/plane, rain/rein/reign, scene/seen, weather/whether, whose/who’s

 

Word list – years 3 and 4

 

 

accident(ally)

actual(ly)

address

answer

appear

arrive

believe

bicycle

breath

breathe

build

busy/business

calendar

caught

centre

century

certain

circle

complete

consider

continue

decide

describe

different

difficult

disappear

early

earth

eight/eighth

enough

exercise

experience

experiment

extreme

famous

favourite

February

forward(s)

fruit

grammar

group

guard

guide

heard

heart

height

history

imagine

increase

important

interest

island

knowledge

learn

length

library

material

medicine

mention

minute

natural

naughty

notice

occasion(ally)

often

opposite

ordinary

particular

peculiar

perhaps

popular

position

possess(ion)

possible

potatoes

pressure

probably

promise

purpose

quarter

question

recent

regular

reign

remember

sentence

separate

special

straight

strange

strength

suppose

surprise

therefore

though/although

thought

through

various

weight

woman/women

Notes and guidance (non-statutory)

Teachers should continue to emphasise to pupils the relationships between sounds and letters, even when the relationships are unusual. Once root words are learnt in this way, longer words can be spelt correctly, if the rules and guidance for adding prefixes and suffixes are also known.

Examples:

business: once busy is learnt, with due attention to the unusual spelling of the /i/ sound as ‘u’, business can then be spelt as busy + ness, with the y of busy changed to i according to the rule.

disappear: the root word appear contains sounds which can be spelt in more than one way so it needs to be learnt, but the prefix dis– is then simply added to appear.

Understanding the relationships between words can also help with spelling. Examples:

  • bicycle is cycle (from the Greek for wheel) with bi– (meaning ‘two’) before it.
  • medicine is related to medical so the /s/ sound is spelt as c.
  • opposite is related to oppose, so the schwa sound in opposite is spelt as o.